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Kyodo News Digest: Sept. 18, 2022


Vancouver Olympic figure skating silver medalist Mao Asada (front) performs on the first day of an ice show staged by her in the Shiga Prefecture capital of Otsu, western Japan, on Sept. 10, 2022. The show, called “Beyond,” will tour over 10 prefectures through March 2023. (Kyodo) ==Kyodo

The following is the latest list of selected news summaries by Kyodo News.

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Japan braces for possible landing of strong typhoon on Kyushu region

TOKYO – Japan on Sunday braced for the possibility of a large and powerful typhoon landing on its southwestern region of Kyushu, with the weather agency warning of unprecedented winds and waves, and calling for the highest level of caution.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said Typhoon Nanmadol has moved slowly northward to Kyushu and is forecast to come very close to the region on Sunday through Monday. A number of trains and flights have been canceled.

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Obama to skip Japan ex-PM Abe’s state funeral, Hagerty to attend

WASHINGTON – Former U.S. President Barack Obama is no longer expected to attend the state funeral of assassinated former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to be held later this month, U.S. and Japanese sources said Saturday.

Former U.S. Ambassador to Japan William Hagerty is set to attend the funeral slated for Sept. 27 in Tokyo as President Joe Biden’s administration wants to offer condolences through a bipartisan representative, they said.

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FOCUS: Hopes grow for win-win effect of inbound tourism in Japan, weak yen

TOKYO – Japanese policymakers expect that a further reopening of Japan’s borders to foreign visitors will breathe life into inbound tourism that had been hit by COVID-19 travel restrictions.

The hope is that a weaker yen will be an additional boost, providing a win-win situation for foreign tourists, who would be compelled to splurge by taking advantage of the currency effect, and for Japan, where the negative side of the yen’s slide, especially against the U.S. dollar, has become all the more visible.

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Japanese, Australian firms collaborate on world’s tallest timber tower

TOKYO – Construction firms from Japan and Australia have started work on a 182-meter-high skyscraper in central Sydney in a collaboration to build what will be the world’s tallest hybrid-timber building using an eco-friendly wood product.

Tokyo-based Obayashi Corp. and Sydney-based Built Pty Ltd. plan to complete construction on the 39-story “Atlassian Central” in 2026, to be used for offices, accommodation and retail outlets, the companies said recently in press releases.

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60% of people with foreign roots questioned by Japanese police: survey

TOKYO – Around 60 percent of more than 2,000 people with foreign roots surveyed earlier this year by the Tokyo Bar Association have been questioned by Japanese police over the past five years, with encounters more frequent among those of African or Latin American backgrounds, a recently released report showed.

The survey found most people who had been questioned had undergone the treatment on multiple occasions, according to the report released by the association on Sept. 9, adding 80 percent of those with African and Latin American roots had to deal with investigators.

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Golf: Furue tied for lead, Shibuno 4th at Portland Classic

PORTLAND, Oregon – Ayaka Furue of Japan shot a 5-under 67 on Saturday to move into a three-way tie for the lead after the third round of the AmazingCre Portland Classic.

Furue sits at 13-under-par 203, along with Americans Andrea Lee and Lilia Vu. Japanese compatriot Hinako Shibuno fired a 66 and is tied for fourth at 12 under at Columbia Edgewater Country Club in Portland, Oregon.





Read More:Kyodo News Digest: Sept. 18, 2022