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Tracking the Fighting in Sudan: Maps and Videos




Satellite image showing a smoke plume on the north side of Kobar bridge.

Source: Satellite image by Planet Labs captured Sunday

The New York Times

An all-out battle for control of Khartoum, Sudan’s capital, left a bridge across the Nile River in flames, the airport in ruins and many residents huddled in their homes as fighter jets flew overhead. Here’s where fighting has been reported:


A map of areas where fighting has been reported in Sudan.





“We can feel the windows

and doors shaking,”

a resident said

Bridges over the

Nile are a key focus

Major battle

near Kober

prison

Clashes along

Nile Street

Artillery barrages and

heavy fighting for

military headquarters

“We can feel the windows

and doors shaking,”

a resident said

Bridges over the

Nile are a key focus

Major battle near

Kober prison

Artillery barrages

and heavy fighting

for military

headquarters


Source: The New York Times reporting (locations of fighting), OpenStreetMap (base map), Sentinel-2 ESRI (built areas)

The New York Times

Clashes between rival armed forces spread across the streets of the capital and to the four corners of the country on the conflict’s second day. Artillery barrages hit Sudan’s military headquarters early on Sunday morning, and satellite imagery from Maxar Technologies showed major damage to multiple government buildings.






Defense Ministry building

Ministry of Energy and Mining

Defense Ministry building

Ministry of Energy and Mining

Defense Ministry building

Ministry of Energy and Mining


Satellite images by Maxar Technologies

The New York Times

One focus of the fighting on Sunday was for control of the bridges across the Nile, which divides the capital. A major battle erupted on Saturday morning near Kober Prison, on the north side of the city, where the former dictator Omar Hassan al-Bashir is being held.

Gunfights, shelling and other clashes were widespread. Electricity is out, several residents said. One resident described huddling inside during hours of nonstop fighting, afraid that bullets would come through the windows. Dozens have been reported killed.

“We don’t know what’s happening,” Dallia Mohamed Abdelmoniem, a resident of the Al Almarat neighborhood near Khartoum’s airport, said by phone, over the din of a fighter jet streaking through the sky.

Issam Khalafalla via Associated Press

In an illustration of the dangers facing civilians in the city, a stray rocket struck the home of Norway’s ambassador to Sudan, Endre Stiansen, just before 2 a.m. on Sunday. Nobody was injured.

The chaos was an alarming turn for Sudan, a large, strategically significant state that serves as a bridge between north and sub-Saharan Africa. Only four years ago, a jubilant popular uprising toppled Mr. al-Bashir, the widely detested ruler of three decades.



Sudanese Army soldiers in Port Sudan.

Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Two groups are vying for control of the country: The Sudanese Army led by Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces, a powerful paramilitary group led by Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan. The generals united to take control of the country in a coup in 2021, but they are now fighting each other.

By Sunday afternoon, both sides claimed control of key military and civilian installations, but the claims were impossible to verify.

Satellite images taken Sunday showed thick black smoke filling the sky over the city’s airport and two large Il-76 transport planes on fire. At least four other planes have been burned since Saturday, according to satellite imagery reviewed by The Times.


Satellite images showing heavy smoke in Khartoum Airport.





One plane destroyed

at southern end

One plane destroyed

at southern end


Source: Satellite images by Maxar Technologies

The New York Times

Fighting spreads in Darfur

Fighting spread across the country, where the two groups battled for control of airfields and military bases. While it was too early to tell if Sudan was tumbling into civil war, some people told The New York Times that the broad geographic range of the fighting made it feel that way.

Violence spread to an area of the country long tormented by conflict and displacement: the restive western region of Darfur.


A map of areas where fighting has been reported in Sudan.





Violence spread

to the Darfur region

Violence spread

to the Darfur region


Source: The New York Times reporting (locations of fighting), OpenStreetMap (base map)

The New York Times

Clashes had spread to the cities of Nyala in South Darfur, El Fasher in North Darfur and Zalingei in Central Darfur, forcing many people to flee displacement camps and their homes in those towns, said Adam Regal, a spokesman for the General Coordination for Refugees and Displaced in Darfur, an aid agency.

Video from Saturday showed tanks rolling down the streets of Port Sudan, the country’s main seaport on the Red Sea.

On Saturday night, the Rapid Support Forces claimed on Twitter that they controlled most of the country’s military installations, including an airport in El Geneina.

But such claims of control were disputed. Both sides have said they control key installations across the country, and each side accuses the other of staging a coup.



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